Friday, 17 July 2015

Weekend reading and viewing: 18th - 19th July 2015


Glasses for children with Down syndrome
Sipping Lemonade, 15th July 2015
A couple of months ago, we learned that Kate needed glasses. My first thought (after learning all about her prescription, of course) was: She’ll be adorable in glasses!

My second thought was: Wait — how in the world will we get her to keep them on? ...


Light (music video)



Published 14th July 2015
... in 2014, we had a beautiful little girl with Down Syndrome and two heart conditions. We named her Lucette, which means 'light." Lucie has taught us how much every life matters. This song is for her and all the beautiful people on this planet with special needs. We think that you make this world a better place ...

“The sock is in the dog!”
Wyn Evans, Down's Syndrome Association (UK) blog, 13th July 2015
...  “Where are your socks?” IB’s mum asked. “In the dog!” came the reply. Mum evidently assumed that her girl was struggling to find the right words, but ‘The Boss’ and I both knew that IB was speaking no less than the truth.


You see, we have two Wire-Haired Hungarian Vizsla bitches; Hearth-Rug is twelve years old and Sock-Gobbler two ...

10 things I love about my child with Down syndrome
Kidspot, 14th July 2015
Giving birth to a child with Down syndrome does alter your path through life ... in a way that Kat Abianac would not trade for the world ...

Soccer Photos Capture Special Bond Between Dad and Son With Down SyndromeMelissa McGlensey, The Mighty, 14th July 2015
Henry Pavitt started kicking soccer balls when he was still using a walker — a full six months before he started walking independently.

Henry, 6, from New South Wales, Australia, was born with Down syndrome and a congenital heart disease that requires regular surgery ...

The Threat of Disability: Catastrophe
Sharon Horgan, Criptiques, 14th July 2015
I would love to see disability presented as something to be celebrated and welcomed, not feared. I would love to see a show featuring anything that disrupts the ubiquitous ableist narrative that disability = tragedy. Why is that so impossible to find? Answer: non-disabled people are writing for other non-disabled people. We as disabled people are not included in the intended audience.


The most important role of my life
Vanessa Diaz, Revolucion Latina, 7th July 2015
For as long as I can remember I have craved adventure, a life full of challenges and excitement ... Then I felt it again, fear. I didn’t know what to expect and it scared me to my core. The only thing I knew for sure was that I loved these boys ...


Cultivating successful roles
Libby Ellis, In Charge, 25th March 2014
Lucy and her family have been very thoughtful in creating a role at her local florist. In this article we share the very practical steps they took ...

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